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Volume 17 Issue 446- Dhul Qadah 11, 1438 AH August 4, 2017
 
 
 
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   :: Youth / Education
::5 Public Speaking Secrets That Will Help You Make Your Company Grow


People trust eloquent speakers more than honest ones -- which doesn’t mean to start lying. Just sharpen your speaking skills.
By: Ari Rabban


If you’re on stage, your audience members will assume you’re the expert and will treat you as such -- unless you give them a reason to believe otherwise.
The 2 Unbreakable Laws of Public Speaking
Public speaking can be frightening, but for entrepreneurs who learn to take, and own, the podium, the benefits far outweigh the stage fright.
Succeeding as a small business is all about building trust with your consumers.
According to Harvard University researchers, people trust eloquent speakers more than honest ones, even when the more articulate speaker isn’t telling the whole truth. That doesn’t mean you can start lying to get ahead, but it does mean that sharper speaking skills could improve your brand’s
perception.
Even if you aren’t a natural, you can improve your public speaking with practice and a little support. Researchers at the University of West Australia found that students they studied who received reassuring messages before a speech reported less anxiety than those who did not.
So, if you can get past your anxiety, you’ll find that public speaking has its perks: I met several of my largest Phone.com clients, ffor example, when they approached me after one of my speaking opportunities. In some of these cases, they were the only ones to approach me out of the entire crowd.
So, if you invest a bit of practice, you’ll find that public speaking can help you meet new people, improve your presentations and strengthen your brand. Here are several tips to help you do that:
1. Eliminate ambiguity about your audience -- and your topic.
Don’t just get to know your audience members the day of the speech -- research them beforehand. How many will be there? What do the demographics look like? Simplify your delivery if you’re speaking to a group of laypeople, or get technical if your audience consists entirely of engineers.
Also recognize that simply knowing your topic isn’t enough. Dig deeper and find out why your audience cares about this topic right now, what positions on the issues in your industry they hold and what kinds of questions you can expect to receive.
Also, be prepared to pivot: Once, when Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg was preparing for one of her speeches, she ditched her original presentation, which she described as “chock-full of facts and figures and nothing personal.”
Instead, she changed tactics at the last minute to present emotional stories, and her speech became a viral hit.
2. Familiarize yourself with the
environment.
Will you have video screens and a projector? Where are the lights; how are the seats arranged, and what is the dress code? The more you know about your speaking environment, the fewer hiccups you’ll encounter on the day of the event -- and the more commanding and assertive presence you’ll have, helping you make stronger connections with attendees.
As for the dress code, regardless of what they’re wear, make sure you wear something comfortable. Nothing exacerbates nerves like a too-tight shirt collar or pants that ride up.
3. Study the pros -- and yourself.
Practice your speech in front of a mirror. When you’re ready, try it out on colleagues and friends. Open yourself to helpful criticism, and try not to take feedback personally. Accept opportunities to speak at smaller engagements to build your chops and acclimate to the role before you go after the bigger clients you really want to land.
If you feel that your presentation skills are shaky, find videos of previous sessions of the event and watch the successful speakers. As former TEDx talk participant Brooke Warner said, describing that experience: “There are countless videos to study, books to read and online resources from those who’ve walked before you. I consumed everything, and voraciously. I watched close to 50 talks, read two books,and read many many posts.”
4. Start and finish strong -- with no
apologies.
Spend extra time crafting the beginning and end of your speech. A strong start will help you get into a rhythm, while a powerful finish will help you drive the point home in case you start to stumble along the way. Do what comes naturally -- not every great speech needs a joke or tragic story to be memorable.
When you feel uncertain, your first instinct mayt be to apologize to your audience for your shortcomings. Don’t do it. If you’re on the stage, the audience will assume you’re the expert and treat you as such unless you explicitly tell them not to.
5. Reap the rewards.
Even if half your audience exits, one impressed person could be the gateway to your next major contract. Whether you leave with dozens of leads or just spread a passionate message, appreciate that you were the organizer’s choice, and take what you can from the experience.
You don’t have to wait for audience members to approach you. Make clear that you’ll be available to talk and connect in person after the speech and via your social media profiles or email in the subsequent days and weeks. Some leads might take longer to ruminate on your message, so make sure you’re easy to find when they’re ready to chat.

::Muslim Food Bank Success Stories! “Disabled but not Despondent”


An Iraqi Immigrant Keeps his Spirits High as a Newcomer in Canada
Every immigrant in Canada has a story to tell. For Amaan Ali, it all started at a young age in a northwestern city of Iraq. Like any kid his age, Amaan had little to worry about. His days were spent playing with his friends.
One morning, Amaan woke up with high fever and an excruciating pain in both his legs. Seeing his condition, Amaan’s father didn’t wait long. He picked Amaan up and carried him on his back to the makeshift clinic two miles away. The doctor diagnosed Amaan with polio and told his father that Amaan’s legs are paralysed because he was never given polio vaccine.
The doctor said Amaan would never walk again.
Over the years, Amaan learned more than just walking on crutches. He learned how to work around his disability and run the family business. He learned how to stand firm against all odds to earn a livelihood for his wife and three kids.
Just when things started to look up for Amaan and his family, Iraq was invaded. The radio blasted news of civilians being killed across the country. The bombs spared very few schools, the rockets avoided very few hospitals. Very few buildings stayed erect.
The warring parties changed but the war raged on. As the years went by, Amaan somehow managed to drown out the noise of bombs falling on his city but he wasn’t able to quiet the noise in his head. He feared losing his wife to a bullet. He feared losing his son to a landmine. He feared losing his daughters to shrapnel.
When Amaan heard about Canada accepting Iraqi refugees, the decision to emigrate was a no-brainer. What’s more, he heard that people with disabilities receive a lot of support from the government. With this hope, Amaan went through the application process. He had a plan. He would first move to Canada and find a job. Once he settles down and earns an income, he would sponsor his wife and kids.
In September 2016, the Canadian government accepted Amaan Ali’s application to resettle in Vancouver, British Columbia. Besides giving Amaan permanent residence, Canada’s refugee program also paid for his food, shelter and other necessities.
At first, Amaan lived in the Salvation Army Belkin House downtown Vancouver but after a few months he found a small subsidized studio in Vancouver and moved in right away. Due to his disability, he had a very hard time getting around the city. When the Muslim Food Bank & Community Services caseworker, Yusuf Khan, took up Amaan’s case, he knew getting Amaan a reliable means of transportation will be life-changing. Yusuf helped Amaan sign up for HandyDART, an affordable door-to-door shared ride service meant for people with disabilities.
Thanks to Yusuf’s help, Amaan could now comfortably commute to attend his English classes, see his doctor and get food from the Muslim Food Bank.
“I could see the happiness in his eyes. It gave him freedom because without that he was stuck in his room.” Yusuf said. Yusuf saw that despite his difficult circumstances, a smile always lit up Amaan’s face and he was a cheerful man. One of the things that made Amaan very happy was that none of his kids are disabled. When asked about his kids’ health, Amaan proclaimed, “They are all very healthy!” with great pride.
Yusuf visited Amaan’s studio from time to time and brought food and clothing for him. Though Yusuf wanted to be a friend to Amaan, he was cautious about bringing up Amaan’s family while conversing with him because Amaan would be overcome with emotions.
“Talking about his family touches him a lot and reminds him of them.,” Yusuf said. “I can see his expressions change each time they come up.”
Yusuf understood what Amaan was going through. He himself immigrated to Canada as an Afghan refugee. Yusuf was young when he fled the war in Afghanistan with his family. As new immigrants, Yusuf and his family didn’t know their way around their new hometown, that’s when a few good Samaritans stepped in. They helped Yusuf and his family take their first steps in their new journey in Canada. Yusuf is grateful for the help his family was provided which is why he volunteers for the Muslim Food Bank now.
“I will never forget the support we received and always wanted to repay that somehow,” Yusuf asserts. “With the Muslim Food Bank, I got that chance.”
Amaan has been in Canada for over a year and a half now. He takes the HandyDART bus every day to attend English classes. Once he becomes a bit more fluent, he will look for a job. Finding a job will mean a great deal to Amaan. It will mean getting his family out of a war zone. It will mean being reunited with his wife and three kids.
These are real stories where our volunteers have an impact on members of our community helping them progress in their lives. InshaAllah next week we will bring you another story. Please join us to have a purpose in your life to make a difference in the lives of your brothers and sisters by coming to our events and registering as a volunteer or donating to your organization, the Muslim Food Bank and Community Services Society (usually referred to as Muslim Food Bank) at www.muslimfoodbank.com/donate. Our email is contact@muslimfoodbank.com and telephone number is 1-866-824-2525.

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